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Which of the following need to be taken into account when establishing aerodrome operating minima?

1. The type, performance, and handling characteristics of the aircraft.
2. The composition, competence, and experience of the flight crew.
3. The dimensions and characteristics of the runways / Final Approach and Take-off areas (FATOs) that may be selected for use.
4. The weather conditions at the time for the approach.
5. The adequacy and performance of the available visual and non-visual ground aids.
6. The obstacle clearance altitude/height for the instrument approach procedures.

  • A
    1, 3, 4, 5 and 6.
  • B
    2, 3, 4 and 5.
  • C
    1, 2, 4 and 6.
  • D
    1, 2, 3, 5 and 6.

EASA AIR OPS
Regulation (EU) No 965/2012
CAT.OP.MPA.110 Aerodrome operating minima

(a) The operator shall establish aerodrome operating minima for each departure, destination or alternate aerodrome planned to be used. These minima shall not be lower than those established for such aerodromes by the State in which the aerodrome is located, except when specifically approved by that State. Any increment specified by the competent authority shall be added to the minima.

(b) The use of a head-up display (HUD), head-up guidance landing system (HUDLS) or enhanced vision system (EVS) may allow operations with lower visibilities than the established aerodrome operating minima if approved in accordance with SPA.LVO.

(c) When establishing aerodrome operating minima, the operator shall take the following into account:

(1) the type, performance and handling characteristics of the aircraft;
(2) the composition, competence and experience of the flight crew;
(3) the dimensions and characteristics of the runways/final approach and take-off areas (FATOs) that may be selected for use;
(4) the adequacy and performance of the available visual and non-visual ground aids;
(5) the equipment available on the aircraft for the purpose of navigation and/or control of the flight path during the take-off, the approach, the flare, the landing, rollout and the missed approach;
(6) for the determination of obstacle clearance, the obstacles in the approach, missed approach and the climb-out areas necessary for the execution of contingency procedures;
(7) the obstacle clearance altitude/height for the instrument approach procedures;
(8) the means to determine and report meteorological conditions; and
(9) the flight technique to be used during the final approach.

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